Logo: The Northwest Water and Energy Education Institute at Lane Community College
Logo: The Northwest Water and Energy Education Institute at Lane Community College

Education & Training for Energy & Water Professionals

Education & Training for Energy & Water Professionals

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2 Year Degrees

Now Accepting Applications for our Fall 2018 Online Energy Management Program
Logo for Lane Community CollegeWorldwide changes in energy resources and demand are creating a need for skilled workers in Energy Efficiency Tech. Enter this diverse field with a two-year Associates of Applied Science degree in Energy Management from the Northwest Water & Energy Education Institute at Lane Community College.

Online Classes and Hands-On Mentorship is the Ideal Combination
We’ve combined the flexibility and ease of online coursework with hands-on training with industry partners in the field to prepare you for a career in energy efficiency. Our goal is to provide students with hands-on, high-quality experiences with potential employers in your area equal or better than what they’d receive in a college laboratory environment.

Apply your knowledge to a growing, stable industry in the Pacific Northwest and elevate your career today. For more information about the Energy Management Degree or to apply today, call Roger Ebbage, director of NWEEI, at (541) 463-6160 or email .

Learn about all three of our 2-year Associates of Applied Science technical degrees offered by Lane Community College’s NWEEI program.

Energy Management Online

Distance Learning student working online with young child on lap

Learn how to evaluate energy use patterns, recommend energy efficiency strategies, integrate alternative energy sources, and perform systems analysis to solve energy related problems. The 2-year energy online degree will to fit around your current work schedule, and includes a technical hands-on component that allows you to work directly with mentors at industry partners throughout Oregon and Washington. Scholarships are available! 

Read more ...

Building Controls Technician

Computer system running Building Automation Software

Today’s buildings are complex technological structures comprised of interactive systems charged with delivering safe, healthy and affordable physical environments. Building automation integrates these electronic and mechanical systems to optimize operations and create an efficient “smart” building. Scholarships are available for this degree!

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Water Conservation Technician

Group of hands hold a circle of water

The Water Conservation Technician program consists of students and faculty dedicated to improving community water security and quality using ecologically sustainable practices. The program trains individuals to evaluate water use patterns; develop, implement, market and maintain conservation programs; perform public outreach; recommend water efficiency techniques; integrate alternative water sources; and perform systems analysis to solve problems.

As water related issues continue to increase, more voluntary and mandatory water conservation opportunities are being created that require a technical skill set like that which is offered within this program.

Earn $36,000- 51,000 annually while helping to create a positive change within our natural environment

The imminent crisis of Earth’s shrinking water supply is building a wave of opportunities for scientific expertise, knowledge, and innovative solutions ...

Carol Milano May 2010 Science Journal

Program Overview: Video

World Water Day: Video

The Water Conservation Technician program is a two-year Associate of Applied Science degree.

Graduates of the program are doing the important work of addressing the myriad of current and future issues related to water use, conservation, and natural resources stewardship.

Globally, water issues are at crisis levels. Nationally, water providers are scrambling to replace aging infrastructure, retiring employees and maintain quality and ecologic integrity. Western states are already experiencing an exponential increase in water-realated issues due to over- allocated surface water, decreasing snow pack trends, a doubling population by 2050 and rising pollution.

Sustainability, collaboration and interdisciplinary learning provide the foundation upon which a graduate builds skills to conserve resources and money while maintaining ecological integrity.

 

Graduates Of The Program Are Able To

  • Design, implement, evaluate, and market water conservation programs to a broad audience
  • Evaluate water usage patterns for rural, urban, residential, and commercial sites; recommend efficiency measures as well as alternate water sources.
  • Understand water distribution, flow, and elimination systems; basic hydraulics; quality issues; balance and time of use.
  • Understand the many stressors to water accessibility and how they interact to affect supply and demand along with other issues.
  • Monitor, collect, interpret and analyze data to evaluate effectiveness of programs and modify them over time.
  • Calculate water and cost savings and produce comprehensive cost/benefit analysis reports.
 

Our Goal is Your Success!

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After completing the program, your goal will be employment and we take that very seriously. We continually seek out and participate in local, regional, and national networking opportunities for one simple reason - to promote our students directly to those who have the ability to provide jobs.

By providing you with a quality education built around an industry approved job task analysis we are extremely confident that you will be successful.

Graduates find employment in a wide variety of disciplines and may work for such diverse employers as engineering firms, lighting companies, public and private utilities, energy equipment companies, and departments of energy.

Some relevant job titles are:

  • Water Conservation - Program Specialist, Manager
  • Water Resource - Analyst, Specialist
  • Rainwater Harvesting Tech
  • Stormwater - Coordinator, Technician
  • Wastewater - Manager, Stores Supervisor, Program Analyst
  • Conservation Warden
  • Stewardship Coordinator

Degree / Course Descriptions

The classes listed below are subject to change. For the most current information, see AAS degree requirements within Lane Community College’s annual catalog.

YEAR 1

FALL TERM - 19 CREDITS

FALL TERM - 19 CREDITS

WATR 101 Intro to Water Resources

This course provides a sociological perspective of topics including history and perception; water use; basic hydrology, water stressors at multiple scales; stormwater, wastewater and drinking water; water quality appropriate to use; water supply and demand management as well as emerging issues.

3 credits

BT 123 MS EXCEL for Business

Recommend the ability to accurately type 30 words per minute and key 130-132 strokes per minute on an electronic calculator (or numeric keypad). Visit lanecc.edu/business/testing/keyboarding-skill-competency-recommendations for Business Department key- boarding guidelines or contact the instructor for details. This course introduces students to the use of Microsoft Excel to analyze questions found in a typical business setting. Students will create accurate, professional-looking spreadsheets and graphs. May be offered online. Note: BT 123 was formerly numbered BT 114. A student who has taken this class under the previous number may not take it again under this new number and receive duplicate credit.

Prerequisite: CS 120 and MTH 065 or higher or equivalent math placement test.

4 credits

WR 121 Introduction to Academic Writing

This fundamental course for all writing students introduces students to the conventions of academic writing. It emphasizes defining and developing a significant topic and using principles of clear thinking to support an assertive or argumentative thesis. Students will gain an understanding of their subject matter, audience, purpose, and point-of-view, and demonstrate that understanding through the organization and development of their essays. Students will learn how to analyze and evaluate other writers’ work to sharpen their critical abilities as readers and writers. The course also introduces students to skills in source analysis, documentation, and beginning research methods. May be offered online.

Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on Lane’s Writing Placement Test or a passing grade (Cor better) in WR 115.

4 credits

WATR 102 Water Careers: Exploration

The course provides an introduction to water conservation and watershed science technician fields, examining personal and global water issues. The class will define water as a critical concern of society at all levels. Students will investigate water employment opportunities using various sources.

4 credits

GIS 151 Digital Earth

Prerequisite: MTH 060 or above. CIS 101 is strongly recommended. Digital Earth is a computer-aided instructional introduction to geo- spatial concepts course that includes both lectures and hands- on computer labs that implement various geospatial technologies to explore fundamental concepts and theories in cultural and physical geography. Students will be introduced to spatial theory and tech- nology. Students will focus on how spatial technology is woven into our daily lives and what can be accomplished with web-based spa- tial technologies. Students will learn how technologies such as GPS, Google Earth, Multispec and I-Tree Canopy can be used to solve real- world problems and aid critical decision making.

4 credits

WINTER TERM - 17 CREDITS

SUST 101 Intro to Sustainability

What is sustainability? Students discuss, measure and learn how to implement action. Topics include economic, ecologic and environ- mental literacy; history; power and privilege; basic needs of food, water and shelter; energy, transportation and development; products, purchasing, waste and recycling; governance. Features guest speakers.

3 credits

WATR 105 - Water Conservation: Residential

This course focuses on residential water conservation and efficiency strategies. The course covers program development, water use, waste water, auditing, efficiency measures, alternative sources, and incentives as well as fixtures and appliances. Students participate in hands-on activities.

4 credits

MTH 095 Intermediate Algebra

Topics include equations, function notation, polynomials, coordinate graph- ing, rational equations, radical equations, exponents, quadratic functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, inequalities and problem solving methods. Scientific Calculator is required. Please refer to the Calculator Recommendation Chart on lanecc.edu/math. This course provides a foundation for MTH 097, MTH 105, MTH 111, or MTH 211 or MTH 213. This course is available in a self-paced for- mat (see heading Mathematics: Self-paced format).

Prerequisite: Within the past four terms completed MTH 065, MTH 070 or equivalent course with a grade of “C-” or better or passed a placement test through the Testing Office. MTH 095 is a 5 credit course with 4 credits earned through lecture format and 1 earned through participation in the Math Resource Center’s tutoring and additional instruction. If you have taken a higher level math course than this and passed the course with a “C-” or better, you may not use this course for your degree/certificate requirements.

5 credits

WR 227 Technical Writing

This transfer course emphasizes forms of writing demanded in the workplace rather than academic essays. While addressing issues like evaluation of materials and audiences, sources of information, organization and design, and visual aids, the writings include letters, informal reports, descriptions, instructions, and proposals. May be offered online.

Prerequisite: A passing grade (C- or better) in WR 121 or a passing score on the English Department’s waiver exam. Recommended: A passing grade (C- of better) in WR 122.

4 credits

WATR 206A - Coop Ed: Water Conservation Seminar 1

Students will increase their understanding of industry expectations as well as develop job search tools and skills. Students will learn and practice presenting themselves to employers in a competent and professional manner in preparation for a cooperative education internship.

1 credits

Physical Education / Health Requirements 2 

Physical Education
3 credits one course required from the list of activity classes, plus two additional credits from PE 181-298. They may be met in any term of the two-year program. One credit from PE 186W and one credit from a Dance prefix accepted to meet this requirement.
OR
Health Education
One course from this list: EXMS 214, FN 225, HE 152, 209, 222, 240, 250, 255, 262 or 275; or HE 125, 252 (summer 1997 or later), HI 101

1 credits

SPRING TERM - 17 CREDITS

WATR 107 - Water Conservation: Outdoor

This course focuses on conservation at the residential outdoor level including water use & waste; alternative water sources; efficiency measures; and landscape issues such as planning and design, irrigation systems, soils, mulch and maintenance. Theoretical work will be enhanced by hands-on outdoor learning.

4 credits

WATR 150 - Water Resource Economics

Prerequisite: MTH 095 Applies economic and financial fundamentals to water issues such as, efficient allocation; utility rate structures; benefit-cost analysis; water pricing; supply and demand; policy relationships; and scarcity links to pricing. This is an introduction to performing analysis of water projects.

4 credits

ENVS 181 Terrestrial Environment

Interactions among humans and natural land-based systems. Top- ics include terrestrial ecology, biodiversity, agriculture, rangelands, soils, groundwater, mineral and energy resources, waste disposal, recycling, ecological economics, conservation, and sustainable pro- duction. Take ENVS 181-183 in any order.

4 credits

Human Relations 3

This series of courses present the interpersonal ‘people skills’ that are important in the modern workplace. Topics and classes are varied. You must take all 3 Credits to satisfy an AAS degree but a range of Human Relations classes can be directly applied to this requirement. It is recommended students at least take some of CG203 Human Relations at Work as the content can usually be directly applied within the workplace and Energy or Water related careers.

3 credits

Physical Education / Health Requirements 2 

Physical Education
3 credits one course required from the list of activity classes, plus two additional credits from PE 181-298. They may be met in any term of the two-year program. One credit from PE 186W and one credit from a Dance prefix accepted to meet this requirement.
OR
Health Education
One course from this list: EXMS 214, FN 225, HE 152, 209, 222, 240, 250, 255, 262 or 275; or HE 125, 252 (summer 1997 or later), HI 101

2 credits

YEAR 2

FALL TERM - 17 CREDITS

WATR 210 - Water Conservation: Industrial / Commercial

Course focuses on retrofitting to increase wise water use. Emphasis of the class will be water use, waste, efficiency and auditing for Commercial, Industrial and Institutional (CII) sites. Topics include metering, sanitation, process water use, and heating and cooling systems. Concept of Industrial Ecology introduced.

4 credits

WATR 208 - Water Conservation: Agricultural

Course provides an overview of water efficiency in irrigated agriculture. Topics include water use, waste, efficiency, conservation, auditing, measurement, soil moisture monitoring and irrigation, laser leveling and other emerging technologies. The class includes field trips and hands-on experiences.

4 credits

WATR 261 - Regional Water Policy

Explores policy, regulation, rights and law pertaining to the Pacific Northwest bioregion. Additional topics include national and international code trends, case studies illustrating conflict management techniques and the role of economic incentives in encouraging efficient resource use.

4 credits

WATR 280 - Co-op Ed: Water Conservation Technician

This internship course offers a work experience that integrates theory and practice in the field of Water Conservation. It provides opportunities to develop skills, explore career options and network with professionals and employers while earning academic credit toward the degree.

3 credits

Directed Electives 4 

Directed electives are classes that must be discussed with your program advisor to best match your degree, intrests and job prospects. They may be met in any term of the two-year program. Check current class schedule for which Directed Electives are offered in a given term.

3 credits

WINTER TERM - 15 CREDITS

GIS 245 GIS 1

Prerequisite: GIS 151 or GEOG 151, or consent of the instructor. GIS 1 is the second in the series of Geographic Information Science and Technology courses. The course will build on the foundations of geo- spatial technology introduced in GIS/GEOG 151. Students will use ArcInfo software to explore cartographic principles, projections, data capture, data structures, and data analysis. Access to a current com- puter outside of class (new within last 3 years) is strongly recom- mended. If using a Mac, you will need to be able to run windows applications. Students who do not have access to a computer may be at a disadvantage.

4 credits

WATR 202 - Fostering Sustainable Practices

Study communication and collaboration skills that develop effective community systainability programs.Learn techniques to overcome sustainable behavior barriers. Practice community initiatives through direct people contact, and learn how green industry practitioners encourage sustainable practices.

3 credits

WATR 206B - Co-op Ed: Water Conservation Seminar 2

Prerequisite: WATR 206A This course is a continuation of WATR 206A and further develops students’ understanding of industry expectations as well as job search tools and skills. The emphasis is to provide additional skills that will help students find employment upon earning their degree.

1 credits

WATR 220 - Water Conservation: Program Development

This capstone class explores the design, implementation, maintenance and evaluation of water efficiency plans and programs. Emphasis is on creating formal water conservation plans. Students learn how to make the business case for efficiency and how wise water use supports sustainability.

4 credits

WATR 280 - Co-op Ed: Water Conservation Technician

This internship course offers a work experience that integrates theory and practice in the field of Water Conservation. It provides opportunities to develop skills, explore career options and network with professionals and employers while earning academic credit toward the degree.

3 credits

SPRING TERM - 18 CREDITS

WATR 215 - Integrated Water Management

Prerequisite: SUST 101 and WATR 101 This class examines a wide range of water uses and water issues in multiple settings and at various scales using global, regional and local case studies. Emphasis will be on the interaction between various resource uses and the effects of conservation measures.

4 credits

WATR 221 - Water Mechanical Systems

Prerequisite: WATR 210. Course provides an overview of mechanical systems that use or re-circulate water in residential, commercial and industrial settings. Topics include: efficient use of water and energy, appropriate technology theories and practices, rules and regulations, systems analysis techniques and emerging technologies.

4 credits

WATR 222 - Stormwater Best Management Practices

Students gain a working knowledge of best management practices for stormwater management with a focus on Low Impact Development strategies from constructed wetlands to swales to green roofs. Topics will include site analysis, flow management, and phyto-remediation. Labs include field trips, field work and guest lecturers.

4 credits

WATR 280 - Co-op Ed: Water Conservation Technician

This internship course offers a work experience that integrates theory and practice in the field of Water Conservation. It provides opportunities to develop skills, explore career options and network with professionals and employers while earning academic credit toward the degree.

3 credits

Directed Electives 4

Directed electives are classes that must be discussed with your program advisor to best match your degree, intrests and job prospects. They may be met in any term of the two-year program. Check current class schedule for which Directed Electives are offered in a given term.

3 credits

Note: Required Cooperative Education internships may also be taken during the summer (a maximum of 18 co-op credits).
Prerequisites are required for some courses. Up to date course descriptions are located in the Lane Community College Annual College Class Catalog.
1. Must be completed during first year.
2. Physical Education Activity/Health requirement: 3 credits total. 
3. Human Relations/Social Science requirement: 3 credits total. 
4. Directed electives to be arranged with program advisor.

Take the next step toward a new career in energy efficiency or water conservation

Contact us!

AEE logo: Approved Education Provider

National Council State Authorization (SARA) Approved Institution

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FUNDING FOR THIS OPPORTUNITY IS
PROVIDED IN PART BY THE
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Have a question? Give us a Call.

(541) 463-6160

Additional information regarding 2 year degrees can also be found on the Lane Community College's website located at: lanecc.edu/nweei

 
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