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Education & Training for Energy & Water Professionals

Education & Training for Energy & Water Professionals

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The Energy Management program is a rigorous two-year Associate of Applied Science degree that trains individuals to evaluate energy use patterns; develop, implement, market and maintain conservation programs; perform public outreach; recommend energy efficiency techniques; integrate alternative energy sources; and perform systems analysis to solve problems.

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Students learn to apply basic physics and analytical techniques to measure and define energy use of today’s building systems with the goal of evaluating and recommending alternative energy solutions that will result in greater energy efficiency and lower energy costs.

Earn $38,000- 45,000 annually* while helping to create a positive change within our built environment

If someone asked us to guess how much time it’ll take to get to the store, or how much a car weighs, or how tall a house is, we’ll probably be pretty close. But ask us about energy, and we can be wrong by many orders of magnitude.

Clark Williams-Derry Sightline Institute

Buildings consume 70% of all the electricity produced in the U.S. Advancing energy efficiency in buildings is a critical component of a secure, economically advantageous energy balance leading toward a more sustainable future. As energy related issues continue to increase, more voluntary and mandatory energy conservation opportunities are being created that require a technical skill set like that which is offered through the program.


The program provides a comprehensive technical education that prepares graduates to evaluate commercial building energy usage with the goal of saving energy, money and natural resources.

Graduates Of The Program Are Able To

  • Evaluate energy use patterns of residential and commercial buildings.
  • Recommend energy efficiency and renewable energy solutions for high energy consuming buildings.
  • Understand the interaction between energy consuming building systems and based on that understanding make energy consumption recommendations.
  • Produce energy evaluation technical reports and make presentations leading to project implementation.
  • Develop and evaluate inferences and predictions that are based on collected data.
  • Read and analyze building blue prints including floor, mechanical, and electrical plans.
  • Use problem-solving techniques & mathematics to transform concepts into energy related projects.

Our Goal is Your Success!

After completing the program, your goal will be employment and we take that very seriously. We continually seek out and participate in local, regional, and national networking opportunities for one simple reason - to promote our students directly to those who have the ability to provide jobs.

By providing you with a quality education built around an industry approved job task analysis we are extremely confident that you will be successful.

Graduates find employment in a wide variety of disciplines and may work for such diverse employers as engineering firms, lighting companies, public and private utilities, energy equipment companies, and departments of energy.

Some relevant job titles are:

  • Energy Program - Specialist, Manager, Coordinator
  • Energy - Auditor, Analyst, Specialist
  • Commissioning Technician
  • Facility Manager
  • Control System Specialist
  • Building Operator
  • Weatherization Installer and Technician

Degree / Class Overview

The classes listed below are subject to change. For the most current information, see AAS degree requirements within Lane Community College’s annual catalog.

YEAR 1

FALL TERM - 22 CREDITS

Recommend the ability to accurately type 30 words per minute and key 130-132 strokes per minute on an electronic calculator (or numeric keypad). Visit lanecc.edu/business/testing/keyboarding-skill-competency-recommendations for Business Department key- boarding guidelines or contact the instructor for details. This course introduces students to the use of Microsoft Excel to analyze questions found in a typical business setting. Students will create accurate, professional-looking spreadsheets and graphs. May be offered online. Note: BT 123 was formerly numbered BT 114. A student who has taken this class under the previous number may not take it again under this new number and receive duplicate credit.

Prerequisite: CS 120 and MTH 065 or higher or equivalent math placement test.

Reading commercial architectural plans, examining their characteristics for evaluating and maintaining electrical, plumbing, HVAC, and energy management related design and materials. Introductory drafting and plans drawing skill will be presented including sketches, free hand and cutting plan methods.

Topics include equations, function notation, polynomials, coordinate graph- ing, rational equations, radical equations, exponents, quadratic functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, inequalities and problem solving methods. Scientific Calculator is required. Please refer to the Calculator Recommendation Chart on lanecc.edu/math. This course provides a foundation for MTH 097, MTH 105, MTH 111, or MTH 211 or MTH 213. This course is available in a self-paced for- mat (see heading Mathematics: Self-paced format).

Prerequisite: Within the past four terms completed MTH 065, MTH 070 or equivalent course with a grade of “C-” or better or passed a placement test through the Testing Office. MTH 095 is a 5 credit course with 4 credits earned through lecture format and 1 earned through participation in the Math Resource Center’s tutoring and additional instruction. If you have taken a higher level math course than this and passed the course with a “C-” or better, you may not use this course for your degree/certificate requirements.

This course defines the need for energy management as an integral part of society at all levels. The course presents the various employment opportunities available to energy management students through lectures, video and guest speakers. Technical information includes basic energy accounting and analysis protocol.

Prerequisite: Program Admittance.


Introduces the relationship between sustainability and buildings by addressing the "Three Es of Sustainability" in the built environment. Explores the ENVIRONMENTAL influence of buildings; ECONOMIC benefits of conservation and efficiency measures; and SOCIAL EQUALITY of improving quality of life. The course utilizes the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) framework.

Prerequisite: Program Admittance.

The ‘Fundamentals of Physics’ courses provide an introduction to a broad range of fundamental physics concepts. PH 101,2,3 are recommended for anyone seeking a good basic level of physics literacy. The sequence is designed for non-science majors, but also serves prospective science majors who want to gain a better conceptual grounding before taking General Physics. The sequence also meets physics elective requirements for career-technical students, and provides physics transfer credit if needed. Emphasis is on everyday phenomena and conceptual understanding more than calculations. PH 101 focuses on the nature of science, data analysis, Newton’s explanation of motion, momentum, energy, gravity, the atomic nature of matter, and properties of solids, liquids, gases, and plasmas. The class environment includes labs, demonstrations, discussion, and individual and group activities.

Prerequisite: MTH 052 or above with grade of ‘C-’ or better or pass placement test. Some or all of the PH 101,2,3 sequence can be taken in any order.

WINTER TERM - 18 CREDITS

Prerequisite: PH 101 or Department Approval. Topics include residential/light commercial heating systems; heat transfer through building envelope; degree days; sources of internal heat gains; heat loss calculations, indoor air pollution; codes and regulations. Spreadsheets will be used.

A survey of the sources of renewable energy that may be used to increase energy supply in the Pacific Northwest. Included are geothermal, wind, low head hydro, solar and biomass. Environmental, social and economic advantages of each source are assessed.

Prerequiste: Instructor approval. Students will increase their understanding of industry expectations as well as develop job search tools and skills. Students will learn and practice presenting themselves to employers in a competent and professional manner in preparation for a cooperative education internship.

Some or all of the PH 101,2,3 sequence can be taken in any order. PH 102 focuses on the science of heat and thermody- namics, waves and sound, and electricity and magnetism. See information about the Fundamentals of Physics sequence in the PH 101 course description. The class environment includes labs, demonstrations, discussion, and individual and group activities.

Prerequisite: MTH 052 or above with grade of ‘C-’ or better or pass placement test.

This fundamental course for all writing students introduces students to the conventions of academic writing. It emphasizes defining and developing a significant topic and using principles of clear thinking to support an assertive or argumentative thesis. Students will gain an understanding of their subject matter, audience, purpose, and point-of-view, and demonstrate that understanding through the organization and development of their essays. Students will learn how to analyze and evaluate other writers’ work to sharpen their critical abilities as readers and writers. The course also introduces students to skills in source analysis, documentation, and beginning research methods. May be offered online.

Prerequisite: Appropriate scores on Lane’s Writing Placement Test or a passing grade (Cor better) in WR 115.


This series of courses present the interpersonal ‘people skills’ that are important in the modern workplace. Topics and classes are varied. You must take all 3 Credits to satisfy an AAS degree but a range of Human Relations classes can be directly applied to this requirement. It is recommended students at least take some of CG203 Human Relations at Work as the content can usually be directly applied within the workplace and Energy or Water related careers.

SPRING TERM - 14 CREDITS

No prerequisite required. Students investigate the physical principles of HVAC systems. Topics include related HVAC system equations, refrigeration, psychometrics, central forced air furnaces, ground couple heat pumps, SEERs, EERs, AFUEs, fuels, and unitary single zone and multi-zone secondary systems.

Prerequisite: PH 102. Corequisite: NRG 121 or Department Approval.
Students learn analysis of energy systems with a focus on efficiencies of energy conversion devices. Students will gain proficiency in some common units and formulas required to work with energy and power and analyze the energy or cost savings associated with efficiency strategies.

No prerequisite required. Topics include assessment of quantity and quality of light, light sources, luminaries, lighting controls, manufacturer lamp and ballast specifications, lighting power density, lighting-HVAC interactions, retrofit opportunities, cost savings analysis, and lighting codes/regulations. Requires a directly supervised lighting audit project.

This transfer course emphasizes forms of writing demanded in the workplace rather than academic essays. While addressing issues like evaluation of materials and audiences, sources of information, organization and design, and visual aids, the writings include letters, informal reports, descriptions, instructions, and proposals. May be offered online.

Prerequisite: A passing grade (C- or better) in WR 121 or a passing score on the English Department’s waiver exam. Recommended: A passing grade (C- of better) in WR 122.

YEAR 2

FALL TERM - 13-15 CREDITS

Prerequisite: NRG 121 or Department Approval. Students learn to identify commercial HVAC system types and the energy impact of each type. Calculations will be used to determine HVAC system efficiency. Students will investigate HVAC delivery systems including fans pumps dampers, control valves, and ducting. The course includes field work.

Prerequisite: NRG 131 and MTH 095 or Math Placement Test or Department Approval. Topics will include a review of terminology and lighting fundamentals. Students evaluate lighting systems, luminaries and associated components and perform illuminance calculations, become familiar with the IES illuminance selection procedure and IES recommended practices for various space types. Students will work as team members.

Prerequisite: NRG 111 or Department Approval. Analysis of energy investments using spreadsheets to consider total cost-benefits over the life of the investment. Topics: interest, simple payback and life-cycle cost analysis, time value of money, cost-benefit analysis, effects of tax credits, inflation, escalation, and cost estimating procedures.


Directed electives are classes that must be discussed with your program advisor to best match your degree, intrests and job prospects. They may be met in any term of the two-year program. Check current class schedule for which Directed Electives are offered in a given term.


Physical Education
3 credits one course required from the list of activity classes, plus two additional credits from PE 181-298. They may be met in any term of the two-year program. One credit from PE 186W and one credit from a Dance prefix accepted to meet this requirement.
OR
Health Education
One course from this list: EXMS 214, FN 225, HE 152, 209, 222, 240, 250, 255, 262 or 275; or HE 125, 252 (summer 1997 or later), HI 101

WINTER TERM - 13-16 CREDITS

Prerequisite: NRG 111 and NRG 121 and MTH 095 or Math Placement Test or Department Approval. Emphasis is on the analysis of energy use in commercial buildings. Topics include utility bill analysis, identifying energy consumption sources and related energy efficiency measures, use of micro-dataloggers, energy savings and investment calculations, audit report writing. Students complete a supervised field audit.

Prerequisite: NRG 122 and NRG 124 or Department Approval. Topics include building system control theory and devices, including electric, pneumatic, and digital controls. An emphasis is placed on identifying and understanding control strategies to estimate energy savings. Hands on labs reinforce device identification. Students complete an energy efficiency controls calculation project.

Prerequisite: NRG 206A or instructor approval. This course is a continuation of NRG 206A and further develops students’ understanding of industry expectations as well as job search tools and skills. The emphasis is to provide additional skills that will help students find employment upon earning their degree.

Physical Education
3 credits one course required from the list of activity classes, plus two additional credits from PE 181-298. They may be met in any term of the two-year program. One credit from PE 186W and one credit from a Dance prefix accepted to meet this requirement.
OR
Health Education
One course from this list: EXMS 214, FN 225, HE 152, 209, 222, 240, 250, 255, 262 or 275; or HE 125, 252 (summer 1997 or later), HI 101

Directed electives are classes that must be discussed with your program advisor to best match your degree, intrests and job prospects. They may be met in any term of the two-year program. Check current class schedule for which Directed Electives are offered in a given term.

SPRING TERM - 13 CREDITS

Prerequisite: NRG 112 and MTH 095 or Math Placement Test or Department Approval. The course covers the variety of computer programs available for analyzing commercial buildings. Topics include BIN methodology, hourly simulations and an overview of current programs on the market such as eQuest. Students perform supervised computer simulations.

Prerequisite: BT 123 Course will include review of energy units, data gathering for energy accounting utility rates and schedules, energy data organization, adjusted baselines, cost avoidance, load factor, data analysis, data presentation, use EPA's Portfolio Manager software.

This internship course offers a work experience that integrates theory and practice in the field of energy management. It provides opportunities to develop skills, explore career options and network with professionals and employers while earning academic credit toward the degree. Minimum of 6 credits for AAS degree is required

Note: Required Cooperative Education internships may also be taken during the summer (a maximum of 18 co-op credits).
Prerequisites are required for some courses. Up to date course descriptions are located in the Lane Community College Annual College Class Catalog.
1. Must be completed during first year.
2. Physical Education Activity/Health requirement: 3 credits total.
3. Human Relations/Social Science requirement: 3 credits total.
4. Directed electives to be arranged with program advisor.

A History of Success

For more than 30 years the Lane Energy Management Program has been a national leader for curriculum, courses, and activities, preparing hundreds of undergraduate students and professionals for jobs and careers in the energy field.

Sign Up For The Program.
It’s Easy!

Fill out a simplified one page application. A high school diploma (or equivalent) and Math 70 (Basic Algebra) is all that is required for entry.

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Quick Links:

pdfAdmissions Form03/12/2014

pdfDownload Energy Management Brochure12/10/2013

Credit Class Schedule
Fall 2015 | Winter 2016 | Spring 2016 | Summer 2015

Institute for Sustainable Practices - The Institute for Sustainable Practices works toward realizing Lane's core value of sustainability. The Institute also works on improving sustainability in Lane's educational and operational practices.

SUMMER Energy Management Certification
Annual Specialized Training Event

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July 10th-21st 2017
Registration now open!

More Info

Ready to join our 2yr program?

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We've outlined a step by step process that will help you through student enrollment. If you're more of a visual thinker, check out the Energy Education Map / Flowchart .

Have a question? Give us a Call.

(541) 463-6160

Additional information regarding 2 year degrees can also be found on the Lane Community College's website located at:www.lanecc.edu/sustainability/sustainability-degree-programs

 

Program Support
and Generous Donations By

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BetterBricks: An initiative of the
Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance

Generous Donations By
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Eugene Water & Electric Board